Flora, Fauna and the Eternal Feminine

Marco Mazzoni
Marco Mazzoni

The elaborate and enigmatic drawings of the Milan based artist Marco Mazzoni are created entirely by coloured pencils. Drawing on Sardinian folklore of an underground matriarchal culture of witches and herbalist healers, his drawings frequently feature a female face surrounded by, (with the eyes always obscured), finely detailed studies of variegated flora and fauna. Combined with an undisputed mastery of chiaroscuro the effect is seductively disturbing with an undercurrent of bewitching danger and riotous decadence.

Marco Mazzoni
Marco Mazzoni 2
Marco Mazzoni
Marco Mazzoni 3
Marco Mazzoni 4
Marco Mazzoni 4
Marco Mazzoni-The Rescue 2015
Marco Mazzoni-The Rescue 2015
Marco Mazzoni 6
Marco Mazzoni 6

 

Cotán’s Bodegónes

Juan Sánchez Cotán-Quince, Cabbage, Melon and Cucumber-1600-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Quince, Cabbage, Melon and Cucumber-1600-1602

Towards the end of his highly successful secular career as a painter in Toledo, Juan Sánchez Cotán turned towards the Spanish still-life tradition of Bodegónes (a painting of the contents of a larder or pantry), and in doing so created some of the most memorable and mysterious still-lifes in the history of art.

In marked contrast to the still-lifes of the Nederlands and Italy with their tables replete and overladen with all manner of  extravagant, expensive delicacies,  Sánchez Cotán’s paintings are austere, almost severe. The objects portrayed are limited in number and are of a humble everydayness. They are either perched on bare grey ledges or hanging from strings (a method prevalent at the time to stop food from rotting and out of reach of pests), without a beginning that we can see, and set against a stunning use of negative space, an intimate almost mystical velvety blackness. None of the objects touch or intersect, they retain their own unique distinctiveness in space. The positioning is geometric, especially the perfect parabolic curve described by Quince, Cabbage, Melon and Cucumber, rendering the paintings almost abstract in spite of the baroque realism that verges on illusionism. This is still-life as an aid to the contemplation of God’s glory in all his works, especially the mundane and frequently overlooked.

In 1603 Sánchez Cotán closed up his Toledo workshop and renounced the world to join the Carthusians, a monastical order with a strong commitment to solitude and silence.

Juan Sánchez Cotán is believed to have painted 12 still-lifes in total, however only 7 have survived to the present day. Above and below are six works that represent bodegónes perfected by this master.

Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still-Life with Game Fowl ca 1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still-Life with Game Fowl ca 1600-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still life with vegetables, flowers and a basket of cherries
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still life with vegetables, flowers and a basket of cherries
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still Life with Game,Vegetable and Fruit-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still Life with Game,Vegetables and Fruit-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still-life with Cardoon ca 1600-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still-life with Cardoon ca 1600-1602
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still life with Fruit and Vegetables
Juan Sánchez Cotán-Still life with Fruit and Vegetables