Interior Mysteries

Le Sabbat-Jean-Marie Poumeyrol
Le Sabbat-Jean-Marie Poumeyrol

After graduating from the Academy of Fine Arts in Bordeaux, Jean-Marie Poumeyrol taught mechanical draughtsmanship before being let go from this occupation for failing to pass the nude drawing exam, receiving an ‘F’ in this subject at the same time that his disturbing and morbid erotic paintings were becoming highly prized collectors items.

Allied with the artists of fantastic realism, H.R Giger and Sibylle Ruppert are two notable examples of the style that I have previously written about, Poumeyrol developed his style away from erotica, painting mysterious  interiors devoid of human beings but filled with the ghostly traces of absent inhabitants, noticeably numerous fetishistic drawings adoring the walls. The hushed surroundings are bathed in a peculiar pellucid light; gradually the hint of horror that these paintings undoubtedly contain reveals itself  in the eerie calm of these meretriciously rendered spaces

Below is a selection of paintings covering various stages of his career. Information is rather scarce regarding dates and titles, surprising for such an excellent artist of singular vision, however that is the vagaries of reputation and fame.

The Passages of H.R Giger

H.R. Giger-Passage XXVII
H.R. Giger-Passage XXVII

The Swiss artist H.R Giger stated that the initial impetus behind his early paintings (I to IX) in his Passagen (Passages) series was a recurring nightmare in which he found himself in a large room without windows or doors, the only opening being a dark metal hole obstructed by a large safety pin. After getting stuck while passing through this opening he would see a tiny point of light at the end of a long chimney, however he was blocked by an invisible power and he would be unable to move backward or forward with his arms pressed against his body, unable to breath, his only thought being, ‘Oh my God, why am I here?’.

In addition to the dream inspiration the later paintings in the series would feature re-workings of a photograph he had taken of a garbage truck in Cologne, Germany in 1971. Giger was fascinated by its representation of a ‘mechanical-erotic act’, which sounds reminiscent of J.G Ballard’s Crash.

Giger always considered himself a Surrealist and the Passages series. created from the dredging of the unconscious and chance encounter richly deserves to belong in the Surrealist canon. Minimal, obsessive and claustrophobic, it is a truly unsettling experience by a master of the macabre.

H.R Giger-Passage II-1970
H.R Giger-Passage II-1970
H.R Giger Passage IV
H.R Giger Passage IV
H.R Giger-Passages VI-1970
H.R Giger-Passages VI-1970
H.R Giger-Passage VII-1970
H.R Giger-Passage VII-1970
H.R Giger-Passage X 1971
H.R Giger-Passage X 1971
H.R Giger-Passage XII-1971
H.R Giger-Passage XII-1971
H.R Giger-Passage XXV-1972
H.R Giger-Passage XXV-1972
H.R Giger-Passage XXVIII-1973
H.R Giger-Passage XXVIII-1973
H.R.Giger-Passage XXIX-1973
H.R.Giger-Passage XXIX-1973

 

The Infernal Vision of Sibylle Ruppert

Sibylle-Ruppert_Decadence 1976
Sibylle-Ruppert-Decadence 1976

Quite recently I was researching H.R Giger’s illustrations for De Sade’s Justine when I stumbled across the work of the German artist Sibylle Ruppert. I immediately wondered how I had never heard of her before as I take some pride in being well versed in Surrealistic/Fantastic/Dark Art and here was an exceptional example of the genre, that furthermore took its cues from the masters of transgressive literature: De Sade (of course), Lautreamont and Bataille, all of whom I have written about.

One can only wonder at the vagaries of recognition. Although she did have some influential admirers, namely Alain Robbe-Grillet, Henri Michaux and especially Giger, who owned a large collection of her work (the only major retrospective to date was at the H.R Giger Musuem), the critical and commercial success that other Fantastic artists of the period enjoyed eluded her. Instead she worked quietly away at producing ever more horrific images from hell.

Born in Frankfurt in 1942 in the middle of a bombing raid of the city, Ruppert’s father was a graphic designer. She would sit entranced watching her father draw. One day she seized his hand and said that she would also draw nice colourful pictures like he did. Soon afterwards she presented her first drawing; it was a brutal picture of a fist striking a face. Sibylle was six at the time.

A determined  and driven child Sibylle would produce twenty drawings a day as well as studying ballet. Too tall to be a ballerina, she became a revue dancer, touring the world until one day in New York she decided to quit and dedicate herself to art. Sibylle returned for a while to Frankfurt, giving drawing instructions at the art school her father founded, then moved to Paris, where she exhibited for a number of years before resuming teaching.

As well as the literary influences cited above, all of whom she illustrated, visual traces and echoes can be observed of Bosch, Giger, Fuseli, Bellmer, Blake and Bacon, though this doesn’t in any way detract from her singularly visceral and kinetic imagination. In her paintings and drawings the flesh is always in motion; writhing, straining, collapsing, before undergoing the final monstrous transformation. A truly infernal vision that lingers unsettlingly in the mind.

Bible du Mal-Sibylle Ruppert 1978
Bible du Mal-Sibylle Ruppert 1978
Sibylle Ruppert
Sibylle Ruppert
Sibylle_Ruppert___Flucht 1971
Sibylle_Ruppert___Flucht 1971
Sibylle Ruppert-Hit Something 1977
Sibylle Ruppert-Hit Something 1977
Sibylle Ruppert-Snake 1976
Sibylle Ruppert-Snake 1976
Sibylle Ruppert-Kamm 1977
Sibylle Ruppert-Kamm 1977
Sibylle Ruppert-Les Chants de Maldoror
Sibylle Ruppert-Les Chants de Maldoror